NONVIOLENCE (NV)

NV-101 INTRO NONVIOLENCE/CONFLICT RES (3 Credits)

Nonviolence may be regarded as a means, an end, or a way of life. This course examines the proponents, philosophies and techniques of nonviolent action in the resolution of personal interpersonal, societal, and international conflicts. Mohandas Gandhi and Martin Luther King Jr. are among the proponents of nonviolence studied in the course. In addition, the qualities, attitudes and roles of nonviolent activists are identified through studies of the nature of power and the methods and dynamics of nonviolent action.

NV-102 VIOLENCE:CAUSES/EFFECTS (3 Credits)

Is violence inescapably part of the human condition? Can anything be done to reduce violence in one's personal life, in community life, in international relations? This course considers the nature of violence and its biological, sociological and psychological roots. It examines the various effects of violence on individuals, communities and states in times of war and peace. Finally, the course explores some ethical, spiritual and political approaches to reducing violence.

NV-203 MARTIN LUTHER KING, JR. (3 Credits)

This course examines the life and philosophy of Martin Luther King Jr., including the historical context of his work, the basis for his religious beliefs, his commitment to nonviolence, his work for civil rights and his work against the Vietnam War and poverty.

NV-301 PHILOSOPHY OF NONVIOLENCE (3 Credits)

This course explores in a seminar format the following themes: the theoretical underpinnings of nonviolence as a way of life and as a political and social strategy; the seminal thinkers and writers in the development of nonviolence; the moral basis, if any, for nonviolence; whether nonviolence itself can serve as a moral basis for other theories; the criticisms raised against theorists and practitioners of pacifism and nonviolence; the defenders and critics of the just war tradition; and the theoretical differences between pragmatic nonviolence and principled nonviolence.

NV-303 JUSTICE & PEACE IN THE FRANCISCAN TRAD (3 Credits)

This course focuses on understanding the rights and dignity of the individual employing Franciscan ideas and values and the principles of Catholic Social Teaching. It will include a focused study of encyclicals and pastoral letters by church leaders on social issues. Social justice themes will be paralleled with Franciscan Values as found in early Franciscan sources. Integrated with the course work will be a service-learning or advocacy project.

Prerequisite(s): Take CLAR-206 CLAR-207

NV-303H JUSTICE & PEACE IN THE FRANCISCAN TRAD (3 Credits)

This course focuses on understanding the rights and dignity of the individual employing Franciscan ideas and values and the principles of Catholic Social Teaching. It will include a focused study of encyclicals and pastoral letters by church leaders on social issues. Social justice themes will be paralleled with Franciscan Values as found in early Franciscan sources. Integrated with the course work will be a service-learning or advocacy project.

Prerequisite(s): Take CLAR-206 CLAR-207

Restrictions: RG.HON

NV-310 SP.STY IN NON VIOLENCE (3 Credits)

An intensive study of a specific person, issue, or movement related to nonviolence. The content of the course will be announced prior to the semester during which it is offered. The course may be retaken provided the content of the course has changed.

NV-310AD THE DEATH PENALTY (3 Credits)

NV-358 THE PHILOSOPHY OF GANDHI (3 Credits)

The Philosophy of Gandhi course introduces students to Gandhi's metaphysical views about the nature of truth and reality as well as to his views on ethics and his political philosophy, on how human beings should conduct themselves as individuals and as a community. The course will critically examine the various vows required of members of Gandhi's community and the philosophical arguments Gandhi offered for requiring such vows. Finally, the course will examine critically the connection between the personal and political aspects of Gandhi's thought.