HISTORY (HIST)

HIST-ELEC HISTORY ELECTIVE (4 Credits)

HIST-100 FIRST YEAR SEMINAR FOR HISTORY MAJORS (3 Credits)

This course is an introductory course for history majors to be taken the fall semester of the first year. The course serves as an introduction to both the discipline and the department. Although the specific content will change from semester to semester, students will be introduced to key concepts, such as historical schools of thought, basic research techniques, and types of history.

HIST-101 EUROPE TO 1815 (3 Credits)

Surveys the principal political, economic, and intellectual forces in European history from the late Middle Ages through the Napoleonic period. The major trends, key personalities, and important institutions are investigated and assessed for their historical significance. Specific topics to be covered include the Renaissance, Protestant Reformation, the Scientific Revolution, and the Enlightenment, among others.

HIST-101C EUROPE TO 1815 (3 Credits)

Surveys the principal political, economic, and intellectual forces in European history from the late Middle Ages through the Napoleonic period. The major trends, key personalities, and important institutions are investigated and assessed for their historical significance. Specific topics to be covered include the Renaissance, Protestant Reformation, the Scientific Revolution, and the Enlightenment, among others.

HIST-102 EUROPE SINCE 1815 (3 Credits)

Surveys the principal political, economic, social, religious, cultural and intellectual forces in Europe from the time of Napoleon to the present. The specific topics that will be studied include the Romantic era, the Industrial Revolution, European imperialism, urbanization, the two world wars and the growth and decline of Communism, among many others.

HIST-200 HIST. METH.& HISTORIOGRAPHY (3 Credits)

A required introductory course in the methods of historical research and writing. The purpose of this course is to familiarize the student with the most famous philosophies of history and to instruct the student in the techniques of how to gather and to organize facts, to check their accuracy and to report the findings simply, clearly and gracefully. The course will unify the history major's program and prepare the student to do independent research in History 498-499.

HIST-201 U.S. HISTORY TO 1865 (3 Credits)

A survey of the history of the United States from its discovery through the Civil War. American social, economic and cultural influences are woven into the traditional political pattern. Emphasis is on the Colonial Era, the American Revolution, the Early National Period, the Age of Jackson and the Civil War.

HIST-202 U.S. HISTORY SINCE 1865 (3 Credits)

A survey of the history of the United States from Reconstruction to modern times. The course focuses upon the social, economic and cultural growth of the modern United States in the setting of traditional political events. Emphasis given to the growth of business, Progressive Reforms, the Roaring Twenties, the Great Depression, the World Wars and post-war America.

HIST-206 INTRO. TO PUBLIC HISTORY (3 Credits)

A survey of the broad range of career fields and areas of interest in which history can be applied. These include museums, historical societies, archives, historic sites, government agencies, historic preservation projects private consulting firms, computer applications, and grant writing, as well as others.

HIST-207 SPORTS & AMERICAN SOCIETY (3 Credits)

This course follows the development of sports in America from the colonial times to the recent past; over the course of the semester we will examine the transition from folk games to the modern age of spectators. Important to this transformation will be changes in society, technology and business. We will look at the changing definition and purpose of sport, the symbolism of sport, the way in which sport can unify and divide people, and the interaction between sport as a part of culture and society and its relationship to national historical trends.

HIST-208 HISTORY OF AMER. WOMEN (3 Credits)

This course will examine the history of women in North America from the earliest European settlements to the present. Women's struggles and contributions will be studied culturally, socially, economically and politically as we examine their work in the domestic sphere, factories, fields and their demonstrations for rights in the streets.

HIST-250 WORLD HISTORY TO 1450 (3 Credits)

This course is descriptive and analytical survey of world cultures from early river valley civilizations to 1450, with an emphasis on non- Western civilizations in Asia, Africa and the Middle East. Among the themes explored are the importance of land and water trade routes as conveyors of civilizations, the influence of nomadic peoples on the spread of ideas and technologies, the reshaping of local cultures as Buddhism and Islam spread to Asia and Africa, and the importance of urban centers such as Baghdad as intellectual and cosmopolitan capitals before the "rise" of the West.

HIST-251 WORLD HISTORY SINCE 1450 (3 Credits)

This course surveys world history since 1450 in order to provide with a historical context for understanding current world problems. Using an analytical and comparative approach, it examines the rise of Western global hegemony and how the non-West responded and is still responding. We will look at a wide range of topics and issues including nationalism, imperialism, decolonization and globalization. What role has trade, technology, war and revolution played? How have national and regional interests in the Middle East, Asia and Africa resisted and/or competed with the advance of globalization? What geographic, economic, social, and cultural factors created today's world?

HIST-307 COLONIAL LATIN AMERICA (3 Credits)

An examination of the social and economic history of Latin America from the coming of the first Europeans until independence in the 1820's. Topics emphasized will include the physical and spiritual conquest, the forging of new societies, the decline of empire and attempts at reform and the coming of the wars for independence.

HIST-307A COLONIAL LATIN AMERICA (3 Credits)

HIST-308 MODERN LATIN AMERICA (3 Credits)

The course surveys the history of Latin America from independence in 1825 until the present. Special attention will be paid to socio-economic change. Among the topics to be considered are causes of political instability, populism, the Mexican and Cuban revolutions and the relationship with the United States.

HIST-309 ARGENTINA & BRAZ.1700-PRESENT (3 Credits)

This course will examine the history of the two largest countries in South America from 1700 until the present. It will focus on how the two societies evolved from being very different to having similar problems. Among the topics discussed will be the impact of rapid economic growth, immigration from Europe to especially Italy, the inability to establish working democratic systems and repression under military dictatorships.

HIST-310 HISTORY OF MEXICO (3 Credits)

An examination of Mexican history from the coming of the Spanish until the present. Particular attention will be given to the creation of a new society, one that was neither European nor a product of the original inhabitants. The course will also focus on the attempts to create a national identity and on the Revolution of 1910 and its impact on society.

HIST-311 THE U.S. AND THE CARIBBEAN (3 Credits)

This course will examine the relationship between the United States and Central America and the islands of Spanish-speaking Caribbean. The focus will be on the period from 1898 to the present. Among the topics to be explored are: the reasons for the United States' interest in the region; the impact of that interest on local politics; the long-range impacts of intervention; the impacts of North American culture; and an analysis of which social groups ally with outside interests and which oppose them.

HIST-325 MODERN BRITAIN & IRELAND (3 Credits)

A survey of the intertwined history of Great Britain and Ireland over the past two centuries. Topics to be studied include the Industrial Revolution, the British Empire, the Irish potato famine, the world wars, and the problems in Northern Ireland.

HIST-327 FRENCH REVOLUTION/NAPOLEON (3 Credits)

A detailed analysis of one of the most exciting and important eras in the history of the world. The course will trace the collapse of the Old Regime, the various stages of the Revolution, and the rise and fall of Napoleon. The class also will examine the legacies left by the Revolution and Napoleon on France as well as on the entire world.

HIST-359 US IN THE WORLD (3 Credits)

This course examines the history of the United states from the late nineteenth century to the present. During this period, the United States came to play an increasingly important role on the global stage after its Civil War. By placing the United States within a world context, this course seeks to examine ideas such as U.S. exceptionalism, the historical roots of U.S. hegemony, and more generally the utility of national histories.

HIST-359H US IN THE WORLD HONORS (3 Credits)

This course examines the history of the United states from the late nineteenth century to the present. During this period, the United States came to play an increasingly important role on the global stage after its Civil War. By placing the United States within a world context, this course seeks to examine ideas such as U.S. exceptionalism, the historical roots of U.S. hegemony, and more generally the utility of national histories.

Restrictions: RG.HON

HIST-360C WORLD HISTORY TO 1450 (3 Credits)

HIST-362 HIST IMPERIAL CHINA TO 1800 (3 Credits)

China is frequently represented as a monolithic civilization, self-isolated and static in pre-modern times. This course is a descriptive and analytical survey of Chinese history from its mythological and historical origins in the 2nd millennium BCE to its confrontation with the West in the 19th century. It focuses on critical junctures in the evolution of China's civilization and the forces that shaped it including the development of political philosophies, state ideologies, and bureaucratic institutions; empire-building, invasion, and rebellion; economic vitality and technological advancement; and finally, China's rich and varied intellectual, social and cultural life.

HIST-363 MODERN CHINA (3 Credits)

Many view China as an ethnocentric civilization that responded to Western intrusions haphazardly, suffered under Japanese imperialism then under a communist regime but is nonetheless poised to become a dominant world power. This course is a descriptive and analytical survey of Chinese history from the 19th to the 21st century with an emphasis on China's search for identity and power in the modern world. It examines the changing relationship between the Chinese state and Chinese society and the evolving relationship of the Chinese nation to the rest of the world over the past two centuries.

HIST-364 MODERN JAPAN (3 Credits)

After reviewing early Japanese history to understand how Japanese political and cultural traditions shaped its responses to the West, this course will focus on the rise of Japan from the mid-19th. Topics include how Japan "Westernized" became a major world power by the early twentieth century, how the Japanese experiment with democracy gave way to Japanese militarism and imperialism, how the war in Asia and Pacific evolved out of confluence of Japanese nationalism and world politics, why there is a continuing controversy over the dropping of Atomic bombs to end the war, how the American occupation shaped contemporary Japan, and Japan continues to struggle with its historical legacy. This course will emphasize comparison, analysis and interpretation and include a variety of material include a variety of material including historical studies, documentaries and film.

HIST-365 HIST OF MODERN MIDDLE EAST (3 Credits)

This course is an intensive study of a very expansive topic: the rise of modern Middle East. It examines this topic from three different perspectives: the rise of individual nation-states, the emergency of a region with conflicting religious and political identities, and an international arena of competing global interests.

HIST-366 WOMEN IN EAST ASIA (3 Credits)

Women in East Asia explores how Chinese and Japanese women created, accepted, defended, revised or resisted their roles in a traditional society and how these roles changed after the coming of the West. It will use a comparative approach to understand the similarities and differences in these two traditions as well as how women's roles varied across class and ethnic boundaries. This course uses an interdisciplinary approach, emphasizes discussion and includes a variety of sources, including historical studies, oral histories, fiction, and film.

HIST-394 SP.TOP IN HIST (3 Credits)

This course will deal with countries, topics or periods of history that are not usually studied in other courses offered by the department.

HIST-394A SP TOP ASIAN HIST II (3 Credits)

HIST-394B SP TOP WORLD HIST II (3 Credits)

HIST-394C WOMEN IN EAST ASIA (3 Credits)

HIST-394D MODERN JAPAN (3 Credits)

HIST-394E SP TOP: 20TH CENTURY EUROPE (3 Credits)

HIST-394G SP TOP: PRE MODERN JAPAN (3 Credits)

This course will deal with countries, topics or periods of history that are not usually studied in other courses offered by the department.

HIST-394J SP.TOP: EUROPEAN HISTORY (3 Credits)

This course will deal with countries, topics or periods of history that are not usually studied in other courses offered by the department.

HIST-394K SP TOP:THE WAY OF THE WARRIOR IN CHINA & JAPAN (3 Credits)

This course will involve studying an area of history that is not regularly treated in detail in other courses offered by the department.

HIST-394L SP.TOP: EUROPEAN MILITARY HISTORY (3 Credits)

This course will deal with countries, topics or periods of history that are not usually studied in other courses offered by the department.

HIST-394M SP TOP: WAR AND TECHNOLOGY (3 Credits)

HIST-394P FOUNDATION OF THE WESTERN WORLD: FROM THE RISE OF DEMOCRACY TO THE CRISIS OF MULTICULTURALISM (3 Credits)

This course will deal with countries, topics or periods of history that are not usually studied in other courses offered by the department.

HIST-400 HISTORICAL METHODS (3 Credits)

A required introductory course in the methods of historical research and writing. The purpose of this course is to familiarize the student with the most famous philosophies of history and to instruct the students in the techniques of how to gather and to organize facts, to check their accuracy and to report the findings simply, clearly and gracefully. The course will unify the history major's program and prepare the student to do independent research in History 498-499.

HIST-401 COLONIAL AMERICAN HISTORY (3 Credits)

The discovery, exploration and settlement of North America; and the development of a British colonial civilization are examined. Emphasis is given to political, economic, social and cultural trends within the colonies, and their relationship to the rest of the British Empire, up to the end of the French and Indian War.

HIST-402 THE ERA OF THE AM REVOLUTION (3 Credits)

Intensive study is focused upon the period from the French and Indian War to the Philadelphia Convention, with specific attention to the foundations of a new American national spirit.

HIST-403 THE EARLY NATIONAL PERIOD (3 Credits)

Beginning with the creation of the United States, the development of the American nation is studied through the early 1820's. Special emphasis is given to the rise of political parties and to the influence of world events upon the new American nation.

HIST-407 TWENTIETH CENTURY US (3 Credits)

A thorough and detailed investigation of the history of the United States to 1945 touching social, economic, political and intellectual development.

HIST-407H TWENTIETH CENTURY US HONORS (3 Credits)

A thorough and detailed investigation of the history of the United States to 1945 touching social, economic, political and intellectual development.

Restrictions: RG.HON

HIST-408 UNITED STATES 1945-2000 (3 Credits)

A thorough and detailed investigation of the history of the United States from 1945 to the present touching social, economic, political, and intellectual developments. The role of the United States in world affairs will be stressed in this course. Wide reading in specific works will be required.

HIST-410 U.S. CONSTITUTIONAL HISTORY (3 Credits)

A study of the historical background and the legal development and application of the U.S. Constitution. This course deals with the constitutional developments of the Civil War and Reconstruction, the later amendments, and the extension of federal authority in the 20th century.

HIST-417 CULTURE WARS:POLITICS/MEMORY (3 Credits)

This course focuses on the use of history in contemporary partisan politics and on how competing groups use history to establish their own identities. Students will become familiar with the development of public memory and commemoration. Specifically, students will examine recent ideological conflicts between the left and the right regarding the use and interpretation of American history. The topics covered in this class include the influence of history on public policy, interpretations of history found in popular culture, and political correctness and multiculturalism.

HIST-418 AFRICAN-AMERICAN HISTORY (3 Credits)

This course will survey the history of African- Americans from the beginning of their involuntary migration to North American in 1619 to the present day. After examining the origins of racism, the course will follow the ongoing struggle for equal social, cultural, economic and political rights.

HIST-419 DIGITAL HISTORY & ARCHIVAL PRACTICES (3 Credits)

This course is designed to encourage students to blend the traditional skills of a historian (the sorting and analysis of documents) with new technologies. Students will work with primary and secondary documents and also will become familiar with Internet research, Web page creation, databases and a variety of software programs. In addition, students will be introduced to archival management and exhibit creation. Approximately one third of the course will be spent in the library working with archival documents.

HIST-420 IMMIGRATION IN U.S. HISTORY (3 Credits)

Immigration, one of the most powerful and enduring symbols of the United States, remains a contentious issue in contemporary America. The enduring political debates about comprehensive immigration reform and border security, the ongoing mobilization for immigrant rights, and the hopes and fears of a changing America all demonstrate the continued importance of immigration in American society. This class will explore these contemporary issues and others, while also providing a historical and transnational perspective, moving from the turn of the 20th Century to the present day. More broadly, the class will investigate immigration patterns, immigration policy, and immigrants' lives.

HIST-421 HISTORY OF THE FUTURE: SCIENCE FICTION THEN AND NOW (3 Credits)

Science Fiction has long captured the imaginations of the public. However, Science Fiction has also often been considered low brow, a literary form that lacks artistic standing. Over the course of the semester we will explore the history and development of science fiction looking at several themes: How has science fiction served as an experimental literature for those interested in the social and political impact of science and technology; Science Fiction as an attempt to predict the future and what that says about society; and Explore the historical context in which the science fictions was created.

HIST-429 20TH CENT AMER IN FILM/HIST (3 Credits)

Twentieth Century America in Film and History offers an exploration of the United States cultural and social history through the medium of film and other mediums of mass culture. Throughout the semester students will view a variety of films arranged in chronological order. The class will discuss and write about those films as primary documents within an historical context, as manifestations of popular culture, as reflections of society, as manifestations of business and technology, and as works of art.

HIST-430 CIVIL RIGHTS TO BLACK POWER (3 Credits)

This course focuses primarily on the African American freedom struggles of the 1950s, 60s, and 70s. It traces the movement from the earliest years of the 20th century to the emergence of a leadership cadre in the southern church, to the emergence of a generational split in the 1960s, to the increasing militancy and disillusionment that market the later stages of the struggle. We will finish with an in-depth discussion of the Black Power movement and the role and legacy of the Black Panther Party. Students will master the strategy and tactics of the movement leadership, as well as the central importance of the grassroots activism initially in the South, and eventually across the country. There will also be an emphasis on the American cultural production and its response to the CRM.

HIST-431 HARLEM RENAISSANCE (3 Credits)

HIST-432 THE POLITICS OF POP (3 Credits)

This course blends history and cultural theory to illuminate the ways that popular culture and specifically popular music mirror many of the complex political currents of particular historical periods. Questions: what is "popular culture?" What are the politics of celebrity? How is an often subversive cultural product commoditized and marketed for the masses? What is the line between "art" and commerce? What role do race, class, and gender play in the production of popular music?

HIST-450 MEDIEVAL EUROPE (3 Credits)

Development of Europe during the 5th to the 11th centuries. This course examines the fusion of the permanent values of the Greco-Roman world with the Germanic and Christian forces and the development of feudalism, manorialsim, and monasticism.

HIST-464 MODERN IRELAND 1603 TO 1972 (3 Credits)

This course considers the political, social, cultural and religious history of Ireland and its fluctuating relationships with England in the period frm the death of Queen Elizabeth to the 1970's. Special emphasis will be placed on Catholic emacipation, the famine, The Home Rule Movement and Ulster in the 20th century.

HIST-475 WORLD WAR II (3 Credits)

Analyzes the causes, the diplomatic and military history, and resolution of the Second World War. This course also examines the causes of the Cold War, the relationship between diplomacy and the origins of such a war, and the global impact of this conflict.

HIST-491 ADV HISTORY READING PROGRAM (3 Credits)

This required course is designed for senior History majors. In a seminar format, a small group of students will meet once a week to discuss an assigned book. This intensive reading course will serve as a capstone to a student's college career. Each student not only will be required to read and analyze several books, but also explain and defend his or her interpretations. The weekly readings will encourage students to synthesize knowledge and employ skills gained in previous semesters.

Restrictions: RG.HIST

HIST-491H ADV HISTORY READING PROGRAM (3 Credits)

This required course is designed for senior History majors. In a seminar format, a small group of students will meet once a week to discuss an assigned book. This intensive reading course will serve as a capstone to a student's college career. Each student not only will be required to read and analyze several books, but also explain and defend his or her interpretations. The weekly readings will encourage students to synthesize knowledge and employ skills gained in previous semesters. Honors section for approved Honors students only.

Restrictions: RG.HON

HIST-492 ADVANCED HIST READING PROGRAM (3 Credits)

This required course is designed for senior History majors. In a seminar format, a small group of students will meet once a week to discuss an assigned book. This intensive reading course will serve as a capstone to a student's college career. Each student not only will be required to read and analyze several books, but also explain and defend his or her nterpretations. The weekly readings will encourage students to synthesize knowledge and employ skills gained in previous semesters.

HIST-492A VIETNAM (AHRP) (3 Credits)

HIST-492B BRITISH IMPERIALISM (AHRP) (3 Credits)

HIST-492C US PRESIDENCY (AHRP) (3 Credits)

HIST-494 HISTORICAL TOPICS (3 Credits)

This course will involve studying an area of history that is not regularly treated in detail in other courses offered by the department.

HIST-494E WAR & CIVIL LIBERTIES (3 Credits)

HIST-494EH SP TOP: ENVIRONMENTAL HISTORY (3 Credits)

This course will involve studying an area of history that is not regularly treated in detail in other courses offered by the department.

HIST-494F SP TOP: HISTORY THRU GAMING (3 Credits)

This course will involve studying an area of history that is not regularly treated in detail in other courses offered by the department.

HIST-494G HIST TOP: US IMMIGRATION/ETHN (3 Credits)

Immigration, one of the most powerful and enduring symbols of the United States, remains a contentious issue in contemporary America. This course will investigate immigration patterns, immigration policy, and immigrants' lives from the end of the 19th century to the present day to understand the historical roots of today's immigration issues, including Arizona's new law against undocumented immigrants; the ongoing political debates about comprehensive immigration reform and border security; the massive immigrant-rights marches of the last few years; and the hopes and fears of a changing America.

HIST-494GH HIST TOP: US IMMIGRATION/ETHN (3 Credits)

HONORS COURSE - Immigration, one of the most powerful and enduring symbols of the United States, remains a contentious issue in contemporary America. This course will investigate immigration patterns, immigration policy, and immigrants' lives from the end of the 19th century to the present day to understand the historical roots of today's immigration issues, including Arizona's new law against undocumented immigrants; the ongoing political debates about comprehensive immigration reform and border security; the massive immigrant-rights marches of the last few years; and the hopes and fears of a changing America.

Restrictions: RG.HON

HIST-494H Historical Topics - Honors (3 Credits)

This course will involve studying an area of history that is not regularly treated in detail in other courses offered by the department.

Restrictions: RG.HON

HIST-494J HIST TOP: CITIZENSHIP/IDENTITY (3 Credits)

HIST-494K SP TOP: THE GREAT DEPRESSION (3 Credits)

This course will involve studying an area of history that is not regularly treated in detail in other courses offered by the department.

HIST-494L SP TOP: THE HOLOCAUST (3 Credits)

This course will involve studying an area of history that is not regularly treated in detail in other courses offered by the department.

HIST-494M SP TOP:PIRACY IN THE AMERICAS 1500-1728 (3 Credits)

This course will involve studying an area of history that is not regularly treated in detail in other courses offered by the department.

HIST-494N SP TOP:NATIVE AMERICAN HISTORY (3 Credits)

This course will involve studying an area of history that is not regularly treated in detail in other courses offered by the department.

HIST-494P SP TOP:CYBERWARFARE (3 Credits)

This course will involve studying an area of history that is not regularly treated in detail in other courses offered by the department.

HIST-494Q SP TOP: WORLD CINEMA (3 Credits)

This course will involve studying an area of history that is not regularly treated in detail in other courses offered by the department.

HIST-495 INTERNSHIP IN HISTORY (3 Credits)

Awarded to deserving junior and senior students. Each student will work for one semester for a scholarly journal, historical association, archival depository, or historical museum. The student will be responsible for a variety of tasks, including the preparation of materials intended for publication and the identification and cataloging of historical records and artifacts.

HIST-495A INTERNSHIP IN MUSEUM WORK (1-3 Credits)

HIST-495B INTERN. HISTORIC HOUSE MGMT (1-3 Credits)

HIST-495C INTERNSHIP IN LOCAL HISTORY (1-3 Credits)

HIST-495D INTERNSHIP IN ORAL HISTORY (1-3 Credits)

HIST-495E INTERN. IN CITY GOVERNMENT (3 Credits)

HIST-496 INDEPENDENT STUDY (3 Credits)

Under the guidance of a professor, a student will engage in an advanced project of reading or research.

HIST-496A ENGLAND, 1830-1918 (3 Credits)

HIST-496B IND ST: CONTEMPORARY JAPANESE TRANSNATIONALISMS (3 Credits)

Under the guidance of a professor, a student will engage in an advanced project of reading or research.

HIST-498 SENIOR RESEACH PAPER (3-6 Credits)

The primary purpose of the senior research paper is to aid qualified senior history majors in developing the ability for independent study and research and in producing a thesis that is intelligently conceived, carefully researched, closely reasoned, properly documented, and clearly and effectively presented. An individual student will work under the guidance of a professor on an agreed-upon topic.

HIST-499 SENIOR RESEARCH PAPER (3-6 Credits)

The primary purpose of the senior research paper is to aid qualified senior history majors in developing the ability for independent study and research and in producing a thesis that is intelligently conceived, carefully researched, closely reasoned, properly documented, and clearly and effectively presented. An individual student will work under the guidance of a professor on an agreed-upon topic.

HIST-499B SP.TOP IN HISTORY-FIJI (3 Credits)