INTERNATIONAL STUDIES (IS)

IS-101 INTRO TO INTERNATIONAL STUDIES (3 Credits)

This course is centered on the theme of "crossing borders." The main focus is on the U.S.-Mexican and the U.S.-Canadian borders, but comparative material will also be discussed on the immigrant experience in Western Europe, where a parallel anti-immigrant backlash is occurring. This will provide a contrast of how different "Western" nations (U.S., Canada, various European cases most likely including France, the Netherlands, and Spain or Italy) are dealing with an influx of "non-Western" immigrants. Throughout the semester we will consider the concept of "borders" - both geographical/political and psychological. In our increasingly globalized world, how has the significance of borders changed? We will explore questions of identity, citizenship, culture/culture wars, "the other," community and difference.

IS-101C INTRO TO INTERNATIONAL STUDIES (3 Credits)

This course is centered on the theme of "crossing borders." The main focus is on the U.S.-Mexican and the U.S.-Canadian borders, but comparative material will also be discussed on the immigrant experience in Western Europe, where a parallel anti-immigrant backlash is occurring. This will provide a contrast of how different "Western" nations (U.S., Canada, various European cases most likely including France, the Netherlands, and Spain or Italy) are dealing with an influx of "non-Western" immigrants. Throughout the semester we will consider the concept of "borders" - both geographical/political and psychological. In our increasingly globalized world, how has the significance of borders changed? We will explore questions of identity, citizenship, culture/culture wars, "the other," community and difference.

IS-102 GLOBAL CATHOLICISM (3 Credits)

This course explores the different forms that the Catholic Church has taken as it has adapted to diverse cultures around the world and attempts to unpack the idea of "catholicity" for our contemporary time. It introduces the students to a variety of issues facing Catholic Christians that arise in the contemporary context of globalization. Besides looking at theological and religious expressions and adaptations of Catholic beliefs, attention will be given to the socio-political global scene and how Catholicism approaches the modern day reality of inter- dependency, respect and need of accountability between cultures. Contemporary sensitivity to the categories of culture, identity and location is responsible for a vital creativity evident in contributions, challenges and critiques by various current catholic thinkers and theologians. Special emphasis will be placed on the Franciscan experience and response to globalization on social justice issues relying on available material from Franciscans International, the non-governmental organization (NGO) with general consultative status at the United Nations, and material from the Vatican Secretariat of State and other Pontifical departments which deal with issues of international concern.

Corequisite(s): Take CLAR-207.

IS-201 INTERNATIONAL STUDIES & GLOBALIZATION (3 Credits)

This course is designed to give international studies majors and minors and other interested students an overview of the major themes, concepts, and issues of the interdisciplinary field of international studies. Students will become familiar with the disciplines that make up international studies and their respective research methods as they learn about the historical, economic, political, legal, and cultural elements of globalization. Some of the themes that students will explore in this course include poverty and economic development, international security, human rights, and the future of the nation state in a global perspective.

IS-202 WORLD REGIONAL GEOGRAPHY (3 Credits)

Students will study and evaluate interrelationships of location, climate, landforms, and natural resources with the cultural, economic, and political systems of our global regions. Other topics include population trends, impacts of technology and culture upon the natural environment and globalization as they relate to regions of the world: Europe, Russia, Middle East, Asia, Africa, and the Americas.

IS-222 MEDIA & SOCIAL CHANGE (3 Credits)

This course will emphasis ways in which a variety of social actors (everyday citizens, activist groups, political parties, and other social institutions) form a public sphere through various communication mediums. We will examine how the use of these mediums is double-edged in that they can be used in an attempt to either maintain political power, or to actively pursue social change.

IS-300 QUALITATIVE METHODS FOR A GLOBALIZING WORLD (3 Credits)

In this course International Studies and Political Science students will learn now to develop a research question and choose the appropriate methods and evidence to answer the question and develop an argument. The basics of case study research will be presented alonds with methods such as process tracing and contect analysis. Sutdents will learn how to conduct interviews and find other primary source material from sources such as the United Nations website, the World Values Survey, and social media. Strategies for effectively organizing and writing a major research paper will be presented.

IS-350 WORLD CINEMA (3 Credits)

This course explores the cinematic production on a global scale. The chosen films will reflect the unique socio-cultural characteristics distinguishing the countries under analysis. Students will analyze movies to understand how visual images provide a direct impression of people living in different environments Students will acquire distinct nation and subnational perceptions of global issues including, among others, the challenges posed by

IS-491 Senior Thesis (3 Credits)

The primary purpose of this paper is to permit the student to write a significant research paper that will demonstrate her/his abilities to do independent work and research on the region of the world that they have decided to concentrate. The thesis will allow the student to demonstrate how successfully they have integrated the material from their courses. The thesis should be carefully researched, logical, properly documented, make clear and reasonable arguments and be well-written.

IS-494 SP STUDIES ON INT'L TOPICS (3 Credits)

When deemed appropriate a class on a special international topic will be offered to all students. Such a course can replace any required or elective course in IS, except 102, 104, and 491. Approval must be granted by the Director of International Studies.

IS-494A SP TOPl MINORITIES IN THE MIDDLE EAST (3 Credits)

When deemed appropriate a class on a special international topic will be offered to all students. Such a course can replace any required or elective course in IS, except 102, 104, and 491. Approval must be granted by the Director of International Studies.

IS-494B SP ST: SPORTS & GLOBALIZATION (3 Credits)

When deemed appropriate a class on a special international topic will be offered to all students. Such a course can replace any required or elective course in IS, except 102, 104, and 491. Approval must be granted by the Director of International Studies.

IS-494C SP TOP: COUNTRIES & CULTURES OF THE ARAB WORLD (3 Credits)

This interdisciplinary course, taught in English, examines selected countries of the Arab World and the diverse cultures they comprise. Topics to be addressed include geography, the environment, society, cultural patrimony, the arts and other issues of contemporary significance.

IS-496 INDEPENDENT STUDY (1-3 Credits)

Under the guidance of a professor a student will engage in an advanced project or reading or research. Approval by the director of International Studies must be granted. Such course can replace any required or elective course in IS, except IS 102, 104 and 491.